Duke University | Classical Studies:

    Nayoung Kwon
  • Nayoung Kwon

  • Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
      • Box 90414, Durham, NC 27708-0414
      • 2204 Erwin Road Room 209, Box 90414, Durham, NC 27708
      • Phone: (919) 684-4086
      • Email:
  • Overview

    Nayoung Aimee Kwon is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, the Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies and the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image. Her research areas include literary criticism and translation studies; film and media studies; intellectual history; postcolonial theory; gender and sexuality, with particular focus on inter-Asian and transpacific (Asian/American) cultural encounters. Her current research examines the contested politics of cultural memories, with particular focus on historical conflicts and their legacies in East Asia and the Asia-Pacific.  Select publications include Intimate Empire, published by Duke University Press (Korean translation from Somyŏng Press) which examines the forgotten lure of the imperial language in the contested colonial history between Korea and Japan, Antinomies of the Colonial Archive (co-edited with Takashi Fujitani) which explores colonial-era cinematic co-productions and contested postcolonial legacies in East Asia, and various articles in journals such as Journal of Asian Studies, Postcolonial Studies, Social Text, Cross-Currents. With collaborators at Duke University and TNO/University of Netherlands, she is developing a hybrid platform infinite strategy game (ISG) about historical conflicts. She is a translator of literature and manhwa/manga from Korean and Japanese into English, and co-director of Duke Engage South Korea, a program working with refugees and migrants.  Her research and teaching interests also include inter-Asian and transpacific transcultural co-productions (literature, film, theater); literary and filmic exchanges; theories of empire, translation, and postcoloniality; globalization and transpacific migrations and cultural flows between Asia and America.  She has taught at UCLA, Arizona State University, and Duke Kunshan University.

  • Awards and Honors

    • AAS NEAC Japan Studies Grants. Association for Asian Studies., 2010
    • AAS NEAC Korean Studies Grants. Association for Asian Studies., 2010
  • Professional Activities

    • Outreach
      • DukeEngage in South Korea. Instructor. 2014
    • Presentation
      • Translating Zainichi Literature. January 11, 2013
      • Teaching Korean Literature in Translation. July 28, 2012
      • Colonial Korean Cinema in the Japanese Empire. July 14, 2012
      • Geopolitics of Collaboration: Remapping Korea after the "Manchurian Incident". November 17, 2011
      • Imagining Imperial Communities and Consuming Colonial Collections. August 26, 2011
      • “번역된 조우와 식민지 표상의 난제: 제국의 언어로 글쓰기 [Translated Encounters and the Conundrum of Representing the Colonized: Imperial Language Writings in Colonial Korea],. July 1, 2011
      • Censorship and Dialogue across the Colonial Divide. April 30, 2011
      • Colonial Modernity and the Conundrum of Representation: Korean Literature in the Japanese Empire. March 4, 2011
      • “Fissures, Silences, Failures: Question of Agency in Colonial Cinema”. November 1, 2010
      • “アメリカの コリアンスタヂィス “ [State of the Field: Korean Studies in North American Universities]. July 1, 2010
      • “Cinematic Coproductions and the Colonial Archive”. March 1, 2010
      • Ambivalent Nostalgia in the Japanese Empire. December 8, 2009
      • Empire, Nation, and Minor Writer. June 1, 2009
      • Colonial Co-Productions: Legacies of “Collaboration” in the Japanese Empire. January 29, 2009
      • Kim Ki-Yong's "The Housemaid". October 16, 2008
      • “Translating National Tradition and Colonial Kitsch: Retelling The Tale of Ch’unhyang. January 1, 2008
  • Selected Publications

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