Mark Olson

The Cordelia and William Laverack Family Assistant Professor of Art, Art History & Visual Studies

External Address: 
114 South Buchanan Blvd, A262A Smith Warehouse, Bay 10, Durham, NC 27708
Internal Office Address: 
Box 90766, Durham, NC 27708-0766
Phone: 
(919) 613-6726
Office Hours: 
I'd be delighted to schedule an appointment with you.  I'm generally available on Fridays in Smith, or we could grab a coffee on another weekday.

Overview

Mark Olson is Cordelia and William Laverack Family Assistant Professor of Art, Art History & Visual Studies at Duke University. He teaches courses on media (new & old - theory, practice, & history) and medicine & visual culture. As a extension of his past work with the MacArthur Foundation's Digital Media & Learning Initiative, he collaborates on the development of a new interdisciplinary project that connects the study of the material culture of art history, architecture and archaeology with new media modes of representation and visualization. Olson is the former Director of New Media & Information Technologies for HASTAC (Humanties, Arts, Sciences & Technology Advanced Collaboratory) and the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary & International Studies.

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 2009

Electronic Techtonics: Thinking at the Interface. Ed. MJ Olson, E Ennis, ZM Jones, P Mangiafico, J Rhee, M Routh, J Tarr, and B Walters. HASTAC, 2008. (Edited Book) Open Access Copy

Olson, MJV. "Hacking the Humanities: 21st Century Literacies and the ’Becoming-Other’ of the Humanities." Humanities in the 21st Century: Beyond Utility and Markets. Ed. E Belfiore and A Upchurch. Palgrave Macmillan, July 2013. 237-250. Full Text

Olson, MJV. "Hacking the humanities: Twenty-first-century literacies and the ‘becoming-other’ of the humanities." Humanities in the Twenty-First Century: Beyond Utility and Markets. January 1, 2013. 237-250. Full Text

Olson, M, and Sloop, J. "A Politics of Meaning in Rhetorical Studies." At the Intersection: Cultural Studies and Rhetorical Studies. Ed. T Rosteck. New York: Guilford Press, 1998. 248 – 265-248 – 265.

Olson, M. "’Everybody Loves Our Town’: Scenes, Spatiality, Migrancy." Mapping the Beat: Popular Music and Contemporary Theory. Ed. T Swiss, J Sloop, and A Herman. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1998. 269 – 289-269 – 289.

Olson, M, Szabo, V, and Lanzoni, K. "Wired! and Visualizing Venice: Scaling up Digital Art History." Artl@s Bulletin 4.1 (2015): 20-39.

The Lives of Things. Creator, Designer, Programmer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6uJKKbMBZU (2015)

Abstract

The Nasher Museum has one of the most important collections of medieval art in an American university. These objects are mounted against the white walls of the Nasher Museum with short labels by way of identification. Yet how many of the visitors to the museum understand that these objects were once brightly painted, and once part of full-length figures that enriched the doorways and facades of medieval churches - that they were integrated into much larger decorative programs? The Lives of Things is a collaboration between Engineering and Art, Art History and Visual Studies. Computer scientists and engineers work with artists and art historians, using programming and graphical user interface design for artistic and historical contextualization with augmented reality and interactive capabilities. This eclectic blend of knowledges and capabilities brings new possibilities for interdisciplinary teamwork of broad impact and for horizontal knowledge transmission. Our goal is to use emerging technologies for developing a new model of the engaged museum that reaches out to involve the public of all ages in reconnecting works of art to their original context (e.g., chapels, church portals, or facades) through interactive and gaming displays. Our first installation is now part of the Nasher permanent collection. This is a collaboration with Dr. Tepper (engineering leader), Prof. Olson (art history leader) and Prof. Bruzelius.

Perjovschi's "Scan". Designer. Nasher Museum of Art At Duke University: States of Mind (2007)

Abstract

Integrated hardware-based streaming video components into a servo-driven multimedia art installation.

How to Build a Forest. Performing artist. (2012)

Perjovschi's "Scan". Designer. Nasher Museum of Art At Duke University: States of Mind (2007)

Abstract

Integrated hardware-based streaming video components into a servo-driven multimedia art installation.